Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arthroscopy. 2011 Oct;27(10):1317-22. doi: 10.1016/j.arthro.2011.06.001. Epub 2011 Aug 19.

Cost-effectiveness analysis of the most common orthopaedic surgery procedures: knee arthroscopy and knee anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

Author information

1
Taos Orthopaedic Institute Research Foundation, Taos, New Mexico 87571, USA. jlubowitz@kitcarson.net

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the cost-effectiveness of knee arthroscopy and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

METHODS:

Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from a single-surgeon, institutional review board-approved outcomes registry included 2 cohorts: surgically treated knee arthroscopy and ACL reconstruction patients. Our outcome measure is cost-effectiveness (cost of a quality-adjusted life-year [QALY]). The QALY is calculated by multiplying difference in health-related quality of life, before and after treatment, by life expectancy. Health-related quality of life is measured by use of the Quality of Well-Being scale, which has been validated for cost-effectiveness analysis. Costs are facility charges per the facility cost-to-charges ratio plus surgeon fee. Sensitivity analyses are performed to determine the effect of variations in costs or outcomes.

RESULTS:

There were 93 knee arthroscopy and 35 ACL reconstruction patients included at a mean follow-up of 2.1 years. Cost per QALY was $5,783 for arthroscopy and $10,326 for ACL reconstruction (2009 US dollars). Sensitivity analysis shows that our results are robust (relatively insensitive) to variations in costs or outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Knee arthroscopy and knee ACL reconstruction are very cost-effective.

PMID:
21855268
DOI:
10.1016/j.arthro.2011.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center