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Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch. 2011 Oct;42(4):520-35. doi: 10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0078). Epub 2011 Aug 15.

Peer victimization among students with specific language impairment, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and typical development.

Author information

1
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. sean.redmond@health.utah.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The potential contributions of behavioral and verbal liabilities to social risk were examined by comparing peer victimization levels in children with specific language impairment (SLI) to those in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and typically developing (TD) children.

METHOD:

Sixty children (age range: 7-8 years) participated in the study. Standardized verbal measures and parent ratings of behavioral difficulties were combined with children's self-reports of their school and peer environments to examine the risk for negative peer experiences associated with clinical status.

RESULTS:

Clinical status was associated with elevated levels of victimization, especially for participants with SLI. A potential buffering effect for number of close friendships was found for participants with ADHD and TD participants, but not for participants with SLI. Peer victimization was associated with elevated levels of hyperactivity and stronger narrative skills for participants with SLI.

CONCLUSION:

These results highlight the importance of peer victimization in the social adjustment of students with developmental language disorders.

PMID:
21844400
PMCID:
PMC4496414
DOI:
10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0078)
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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