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Int J Infect Dis. 2011 Nov;15(11):e759-63. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2011.06.006. Epub 2011 Aug 15.

Epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and outcome of candidemia: experience in a tertiary referral center in the UK.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham B152TH, UK. ira.das@uhb.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To review the epidemiology of candidemia in a UK tertiary referral center.

METHODS:

Clinical and laboratory data from patients with candidemia were collected prospectively from October 1, 2005 to June 30, 2008 (a 33-month period).

RESULTS:

A total of 107 episodes were identified. The incidence was 10.9 episodes/100 000 bed-days. The most common predisposing factors were the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (92%), the presence of an intravascular device (IVD) (82%), admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) (51%), and recent surgery (50%). Non-Candida albicans species accounted for 58% of the episodes, which is higher than the percentage reported from other UK centers. C. albicans was the most common species, accounting for 43% of episodes, followed by C. glabrata (31%) and C. parapsilosis (20%). Overall C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. lusitaniae caused 7% of episodes. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 37%. Advanced age (p = 0.003) and the presence of septic shock (p = 0.038) were associated with mortality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Candidemia continues to be associated with a high mortality. Preventative measures should be targeted against high-risk hospitalized patients, especially those in ICUs, the elderly, and those undergoing major surgery. Local surveillance of candidemia is important to optimize management.

PMID:
21840742
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2011.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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