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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 Oct;92(10):1681-5. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.05.003. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

Aerobic exercise training in addition to conventional physiotherapy for chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

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1
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effect of adding aerobic exercise to conventional physiotherapy treatment for patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) in reducing pain and disability.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

A physiotherapy outpatient setting in Hong Kong.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients with chronic LBP (N=46) were recruited and randomly assigned to either a control (n=22) or an intervention (n=24) group.

INTERVENTIONS:

An 8-week intervention; both groups received conventional physiotherapy with additional individually tailored aerobic exercise prescribed only to the intervention group.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Visual analog pain scale, Aberdeen Low Back Pain Disability Scale, and physical fitness measurements were taken at baseline, 8 weeks, and 12 months from the commencement of the intervention. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to examine between-group differences.

RESULTS:

Both groups demonstrated a significant reduction in pain (P<.001) and an improvement in disability (P<.001) at 8 weeks and 12 months; however, no differences were observed between groups. There was no significant difference in LBP relapse at 12 months between the 2 groups (χ(2)=2.30, P=.13).

CONCLUSIONS:

The addition of aerobic training to conventional physiotherapy treatment did not enhance either short- or long-term improvement of pain and disability in patients with chronic LBP.

PMID:
21839983
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2011.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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