Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Infect Control. 2012 Feb;40(1):59-64. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2011.04.051. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

Catheter management in neonates with bloodstream infection and a percutaneously inserted central venous catheter in situ: removal or not?

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study investigated whether removal of a percutaneously inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is compulsory in neonates with bloodstream infection (BSI), and also examined the risk factors for infectious complications when a PICC is retained in these patients.

METHODS:

This was a cohort study of neonates with a PICC who developed a BSI between 2001 and 2007. BSI was defined according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria.

RESULTS:

Of the 234 neonates in the cohort, 99 had early removal of PICC (ER-PICC, defined as removal within 3 days after the onset of clinical sepsis), and 135 had late removal of PICC (LR-PICC, defined as retention for more than 3 days after the onset of clinical sepsis). Resolution of clinical sepsis within 2 days was more frequent in the ER-PICC group compared with the LR-PICC group (80.8% vs 57.8%; P < .001). There was no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of infectious complications and case fatalities, but the LR-PICC group had a significantly higher incidence of recurrence within 1 month after BSI (P = .002). Inappropriate initial antibiotic treatment was the only variable independently associated with infectious complications (odds ratio, 11.4; 95% confidence interval, 3.34∼39.2; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

PICCs should be removed in neonates with BSI, because retention of PICCs for more than 3 days is associated with delayed resolution of clinical sepsis and a higher incidence of recurrence within 1 month.

PMID:
21839544
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2011.04.051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center