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Lasers Med Sci. 2012 Mar;27(2):487-95. doi: 10.1007/s10103-011-0976-0. Epub 2011 Aug 12.

Influence of creatine supplementation on bone quality in the ovariectomized rat model: an FT-Raman spectroscopy study.

Author information

1
Grupo de Estudos e Pesquisa em Ciências da Saúde, Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Sul de Minas Gerais, Muzambinho, MG, Brazil. tatosouza2004@yahoo.com.br

Abstract

The influence of creatine (Cr) supplementation on cortical and trabecular bone from ovariectomized rats was studied using FT-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of organic-phase Raman bands was compared to mineral phase ones. Twenty-one female Wistar rats aged 3 months were divided into three groups (n = 7 per group): ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized treated with creatine (CRE) and sham-operated (SHAM) groups. Creatine supplementation (300 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) was provided for 8 weeks, starting 12 weeks after ovariectomy. FT-Raman spectroscopy was performed on the right medial femoral mid-shaft (cortical bone) and third lumbar vertebral body (trabecular bone). The integrated intensities of mineral phase (phosphate and carbonate bands at 959 and 1,071 cm(-1), respectively) and organic phase (amide I band at 1,665 cm(-1)) Raman bands were analyzed. The mineral-to-matrix (phosphate/amide I), carbonate-to-phosphate, and carbonate-to-amide I ratios were analyzed to assess bone quality. The phosphate content on trabecular bone was higher in the CRE group than the OVX group (p < 0.05). No significant changes in mineral or organic phases on cortical bone were observed. A radiographic assessment of bone density was encouraging as the same findings were showed by Raman intensity of phosphate from cortical (r(2) = 0.8037) and trabecular bones (r(2) = 0.915). Severe ovariectomy-induced bone loss was confirmed by FT-Raman spectroscopy. The results suggest that the chemical composition of trabecular bone tissue may be positively influenced by Cr supplementation after ovariectomy.

PMID:
21837504
DOI:
10.1007/s10103-011-0976-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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