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Vaccine. 2011 Oct 13;29(44):7740-6. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.127. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

DNA vaccine encoding type IV pilin of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae induces strong immune response but confers limited protective efficacy against serotype 2 challenge.

Author information

1
Institute of Biotechnology, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan.

Abstract

Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that causes swine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious and often fatal disease that occurs worldwide. Our previous study showed that DNA vaccines encoding Apx exotoxin structural proteins ApxIA and/or ApxIIA, are a promising novel approach for immunization against the lethal challenge of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Vaccination against A. pleuropneumoniae is impeded by the lack of vaccines inducing reliable cross-serotype protection. Type IV fimbrial protein ApfA has been shown to be present and highly conserved in various serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae. A novel DNA vaccine encoding ApfA (pcDNA-apfA) was constructed to evaluate the protective efficacy against infection with A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. A significant antibody response against pilin was generated following pcDNA-apfA immunization, suggesting that it was expressed in vivo. The IgG subclass (IgG1 and IgG2a) analysis indicates that the pcDNA-apfA vaccine induces both Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The IgA analysis shows that mucosal immunity could be enhanced by this DNA vaccine. Nevertheless, the strong antibody response induced by pcDNA-apfA vaccine only provided limited 30% protective efficacy against the serotype 2 challenge. These results in this study do not coincide with that the utility of type IV pilin is a good vaccine candidate against other infectious pathogens. It indicates that pilin should play a limited role in the development of a vaccine against A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

PMID:
21835218
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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