Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pain Med. 2011 Oct;12(10):1470-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2011.01208.x. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

Coping with chronic musculoskeletal pain in Portugal and in the United States: a cross-cultural study.

Author information

1
University of Porto, School of Psychology and Education Sciences, Porto, Portugal. mafvalente@gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the associations between coping and adjustment to chronic pain in a sample of patients from Portugal and to discuss the findings with respect to published findings from two studies using patients from the United States.

DESIGN:

Two brief measures of pain coping were translated and administered with measures of physical and psychological functioning to a sample of Portuguese patients. Analyses examined the associations among the study variables and compared the results with published data from two patient samples from the United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred seventeen individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Portuguese translations of brief versions of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire and Chronic Pain Coping Inventory and criterion measures of pain intensity, pain interference, and depression.

RESULTS:

Statistically significant positive associations were found between measures of patient dysfunction and catastrophizing, praying/hoping, guarding, asking for assistance, and support seeking; and negative associations were found between the criterion measures and ignoring sensations, coping self-statements, and increasing behavioral activities. Mean differences between the Portuguese and US samples in the coping scales were found for nine of the 15 coping scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results support the reliability and validity of the translated Coping Strategies Questionnaire and Chronic Pain Coping Inventory and also indicate a number of similarities, but also some interesting differences, in the findings from the Portuguese vs US samples, suggesting that there may be cultural differences in how people cope with pain.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center