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J Occup Environ Med. 2012 Mar;54(3):296-302. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318223d3d6.

Psychomotor vigilance testing of professional drivers in the occupational health clinic: a potential objective screen for daytime sleepiness.

Author information

1
Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Psychomotor vigilance testing (PVT) rapidly assesses attention, reaction time (RT), and abnormal vigilance. Thus, PVT may be an adjunct to screening drivers for high-risk obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)/excess daytime sleepiness (EDS).

METHODS:

Commercial drivers and emergency responders undergoing occupational examinations took a 10-minute PVT and were instructed to achieve their fastest possible RTs. Participants with maximum RT >5 seconds or ≥ 2 "super lapses" (RT ≥ 1000 ms) were categorized as "microsleepers."

RESULTS:

Among 193 male participants, the 15 microsleepers (8%) were significantly more obese, but not different on age or Epworth Sleepiness Score. Time of day had no effect on RT.

CONCLUSION:

PVT is suitable to occupational clinics and can identify otherwise unrecognized, impaired vigilance. Further studies must validate the PVT abnormalities most predictive of OSA/EDS and vehicular crashes, compared to adiposity measures alone.

PMID:
21826029
PMCID:
PMC3742032
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e318223d3d6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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