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J Atten Disord. 2013 Jan;17(1):29-37. doi: 10.1177/1087054711413071. Epub 2011 Aug 8.

Cognitive responses to stress, depression, and anxiety and their relationship to ADHD symptoms in first year psychology students.

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1
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the relationship between levels of reported depression, anxiety, and stress with scores on the Conners's Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS).

METHOD:

Information was obtained from 84 1st-year psychology students using the CAARS, the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), and the Life Experiences Survey (LES).

RESULTS:

Approximately 23%, 18%, and 12% of students scored above critical values on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV) Inattention Symptoms, the DSM-IV ADHD Symptoms Total, and the Inattention/Restlessness subscales, respectively. CAARS scores were positively related to reported levels of depression, anxiety, and stress, which accounted for significant variance among the three subscales. Only 5% of participants scored above recommended critical values on the ADHD index; however, a significant amount of the variance on this measure was also attributable to the DASS.

CONCLUSION:

Mood symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and stress may obscure correct attribution of cause in those being evaluated for ADHD.

PMID:
21825110
DOI:
10.1177/1087054711413071
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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