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Neuroepidemiology. 2011;37(1):52-7. doi: 10.1159/000329258. Epub 2011 Aug 5.

Sun exposure, vitamin D intake and progression to disability among veterans with progressive multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
MS Center of Excellence-East, Baltimore VAMC, University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. tycmcdowell@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Early life events have been suggested to influence multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility, and to potentially modulate its clinical course. We assessed vitamin D-related exposures from childhood to disease onset and their associations with MS progression.

METHODS:

Among veterans in the Multiple Sclerosis Surveillance Registry, 219 reported having the progressive form and met the inclusion criteria. Participants reported their past sun exposure, vitamin D-related intake and age at disability milestones using the Patient-Determined Disease Steps (PDDS). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to examine the association between vitamin D-related exposures and time (years) to disability.

RESULTS:

Low average sun exposure in the fall/winter before disease onset was associated with an increased risk of progressing to a PDDS score of 8 (hazard ratio, HR: 2.13, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20-3.78), whereas use of cod liver oil during childhood and adolescence was associated with a reduced risk (HR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.20-0.96).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that exposure to vitamin D before MS onset might slow disease-related neurodegeneration and thus delay progression to disability among patients with the progressive subtype.

PMID:
21822026
DOI:
10.1159/000329258
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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