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Neurochem Res. 2011 Dec;36(12):2401-8. doi: 10.1007/s11064-011-0566-3. Epub 2011 Aug 5.

Reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of high fat diet-fed mice are ameliorated by metformin and glimepiride treatment.

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1
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, South Korea.

Abstract

We investigated the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) and the subsequent treatment of metformin (met) and glimepiride (glim), which are widely prescribed for type 2 diabetes, on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry, respectively. Animals were fed low-fat diet (LFD) or HFD for 8 weeks. After 5 weeks of the HFD treatment, met alone or met + glim was administered orally once a day for 3 weeks. Body weight and food intake were much higher in the HFD + vehicle-treated group than the LFD-treated group. The administration of met or met + glim to the HFD-treated group resulted in a decrease in weight gain and food intake. Ki67-immunoreactive ((+)) nuclei, DCX(+) neuroblasts and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels were markedly decreased in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the HFD + vehicle-treated group compared to the LFD-treated group. The administration of met or met + glim to the HFD-treated group prevented the reduction of Ki67(+) nuclei, DCX(+) neuroblasts, BDNF levels in the DG. The intraventricular injection of K252a (a BDNF receptor blocker) to the HFD-treated group treated met or met + glim distinctively lowered the reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation induced by HFD. These results suggest that a HFD significantly reduces cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by reducing BDNF levels and these effects are ameliorated by treatment with met or met + glim.

PMID:
21818657
DOI:
10.1007/s11064-011-0566-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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