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J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2011 Jul-Aug;101(4):331-4.

The use of focused electronic medical record forms to improve health-care outcomes.

Author information

1
Clinical Education and Operations, Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, Independence, OH 44131, USA. bcaldwell@ocpm.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We tested the use of specifically designed electronic medical record forms, thereby demonstrating the ability to electronically capture, report, and compare clinical data. To that end, podiatric physicians can determine what constitutes the most effective program or treatment for specific conditions by documenting their treatment outcomes.

METHODS:

A prospective case series was initiated to determine the value of using focused electronic medical record forms to track walking programs in the practices of podiatric physicians. Three patients were observed for 48 weeks using focused electronic medical record forms to input data (body mass index, cholesterol level, hemoglobin A(1c) level, blood pressure, and other vital information). Patients were given pedometers so that they could log their mileage and their podiatric physicians could enter it into the medical record. Information was collected using an electronic medical record system with the ability to link multiple templates together and assign logic to create flexible entry completion requirements. The clinical data generated are captured in a common database, where the data offer future opportunity to compare statistics among a multitude of practices in various demographic regions.

RESULTS:

Focused electronic medical record forms were effectively used to track improvements and overall health benefits in a walking program supervised by podiatric physicians.

CONCLUSIONS:

Valuable information can be ascertained with focused electronic medical record forms to help determine treatment effectiveness. This information can later be compared with practices across many different demographics to ascertain the best evidence-based practice.

PMID:
21817002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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