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J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Mar;21(3):350-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2011.04.023. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Arthrosis of glenohumeral joint after arthroscopic Bankart repair: a long-term follow-up of 13 years.

Author information

1
Medical Faculty, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. lauri.kavaja@helsinki.fi

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

The purpose of the study was to establish radiologic and clinical occurrence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Between January 1994 and December 1998, an arthroscopic Bankart repair was performed in 187 patients at our institution. We were able to assess clinical and radiologic glenohumeral arthrosis in 72 of the 101 patients who met the inclusion criteria (74 shoulders) (71%) after a 13-year follow-up. An additional 9 patients were interviewed by telephone. Radiologic arthrosis was evaluated with the Samilson-Prieto classification and clinical arthrosis with an arthrosis-specific quality-of-life questionnaire (Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder test). In addition, functional impairment was assessed with the Constant score and subjective satisfaction with a questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Radiologic arthrosis was diagnosed in 50 of 74 shoulders (68%), with 40 (80%) of them classified as mild. The mean score on the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder questionnaire was 280 points (85% of the best possible score), which is considered relatively good. The mean Constant score was 78 points, and 75% of the patients were extremely satisfied or satisfied with the final results of operative treatment.

DISCUSSION:

The radiologic evaluation and self-assessment of the patients imply that the incidence of glenohumeral arthrosis after arthroscopic Bankart repair is quite common but the symptoms are generally mild and comparable to nonoperative treatment.

CONCLUSION:

Arthrosis rarely causes more than minor subjective symptoms or a minor objectively perceived disadvantage during 13 years' follow-up.

PMID:
21813296
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2011.04.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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