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Exp Mol Pathol. 2011 Oct;91(2):622-5. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2011.06.007. Epub 2011 Jul 23.

The Apolipoprotein B/Apolipoprotein A 1 ratio in relation to metabolic syndrome and its components in a sample of the Tunisian population.

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1
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Faculty of Medicine, Tunis, Tunisia. hanen_belfki@yahoo.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the Apolipoprotein B/Apolipoprotein A 1 (ApoB/ApoA 1) ratio and various characteristics of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a sample of the Tunisian population.

METHODS:

The study included 330 adults aged 35-74 (172 patients with MetS and 158 controls). Waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), glucose, insulin, and apolipoprotein concentrations were measured. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to assess insulin resistance (IR). MetS was defined by NCEP-ATPIII report.

RESULTS:

The ApoB/ApoA 1 ratio was significantly higher in patients with MetS versus normal control subjects (p<0.001). Mean values of ApoB/ApoA 1 ratio increased significantly as the numbers of MetS components increased in men (p<0.001) and women (p<0.001). ApoB/ApoA 1 ratio showed statistically significant associations with WC, HDL-C, TG, systolic and diastolic BP, and HOMA-IR. After adjusting for age and gender, the high ApoB/ApoA 1 ratio was significantly associated with the presence of MetS (odds ratio [OR]=6.10), IR (OR=1.88), and with each of the MetS components, including: high WC (OR=2.43), High TG (OR=6.14), and low HDL-C (OR=6.92).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that the ApoB/ApoA 1 ratio is strongly associated with MetS and its components, as well as with IR.

PMID:
21801720
DOI:
10.1016/j.yexmp.2011.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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