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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 May;20(5):1024-33. doi: 10.1038/oby.2011.241. Epub 2011 Jul 28.

Proficiency deficiency: mastery of fundamental movement skills and skill components in overweight and obese children.

Author information

1
Faculty of Education, Interdisciplinary Educational Research Institute (IERI), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. dylanc@uow.edu.au

Abstract

The purpose of this observational study was to compare the mastery of 12 fundamental movement skills (FMS) and skill components between a treatment-seeking sample of overweight/obese children and a reference sample from the United States. Mastery of six locomotor and six object-control skills (24 components in each subdomain) were video-assessed by one assessor using the test of gross motor development-2 (TGMD-2). The 153 overweight/obese children (mean ± s.d. age = 8.3 ± 1.1 years, BMI z-score = 2.78 ± 0.69, 58% girls, 77% obese) were categorized into age groups (for the underhand roll and strike: 7-8 years and 9-10 years; all other FMS: 6-7 years and 8-10 years) and mastery prevalence rates were compared with representative US data (N = 876) using χ(2) analysis. For all 12 skills in all age groups, the prevalence of mastery was lower among overweight/obese children compared with the reference sample (all P < 0.05). This was consistent for 18 locomotor and upto 21 object-control skill components (all P < 0.05). Differences were largest for the run, slide, hop, dribble, and kick. Specific movement patterns that could be targeted for improvement include positioning of the body and feet, the control or release of an object at an optimal position, and better use of the arms to maintain effective force production during the performance of FMS. Physical activity programs designed for overweight and obese children may need to address deficiencies in FMS proficiency to foster the movement capabilities required for participation in health-enhancing physical activity.

PMID:
21799480
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2011.241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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