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J Crit Care. 2012 Jun;27(3):283-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.024. Epub 2011 Jul 27.

Evolution of peripheral vs metabolic perfusion parameters during septic shock resuscitation. A clinical-physiologic study.

Author information

1
Departamento de Medicina Intensiva, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Marcoleta 367, Santiago, Chile. glennguru@gmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Perfusion assessment during septic shock resuscitation is difficult and usually complex determinations. Capillary refill time (CRT) and central-to-toe temperature difference (Tc-toe) have been proposed as objective reproducible parameters to evaluate peripheral perfusion. The comparative evolution of peripheral vs metabolic perfusion parameters in septic shock resuscitation has not been studied. We conducted a prospective observational clinical-physiologic study to address this subject.

METHODS:

Patients with sepsis-related circulatory dysfunction were resuscitated according to a standard local algorithm. Perfusion assessment included serial determinations of metabolic (central venous O(2) saturation [Scvo(2)] and central venous to arterial Pco(2) gradient [P(cv-a)co(2)]) and peripheral perfusion parameters (CRT and Tc-toe, among others). Successful resuscitation was defined as a normal plasma lactate at 24 hours.

RESULTS:

Forty-one patients were included. The presence of normal values for both CRT and Tc-toe considered together at 6 hours was independently associated with a successful resuscitation (P = .02), as compared with the behavior of metabolic parameters. Capillary refill time was the first parameter to be significantly normalized.

CONCLUSION:

Early recovery of peripheral perfusion anticipates a successful resuscitation compared with traditional metabolic parameters in septic shock patients. Our findings support the inclusion of serial peripheral perfusion assessment in multimodal monitoring strategies for septic shock resuscitation.

PMID:
21798706
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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