Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ethn Health. 2011 Aug-Oct;16(4-5):423-9. doi: 10.1080/13557858.2011.552712.

Race and social attitudes about sickle cell disease.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD, USA. bediako@umbc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sickle cell disease is perhaps the most racialized condition in the history of modern medicine, yet very little research has focused on how racial perceptions influence social attitudes about the disease. Subsequently, the implications of these perceptions for public health prevention efforts and the provision of clinical care are not well known.

DESIGN:

In this brief commentary, we posit that social cognitive and media framing theories provide useful approaches for assessing relations between race and social attitudes about sickle cell disease.

CONCLUSION:

Such inquiries might lead to more rigorous study of mechanisms that shape perceptions about sickle cell risk, interpersonal empathy toward patients, and public support for sickle cell-related policies.

PMID:
21797727
DOI:
10.1080/13557858.2011.552712
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center