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Emotion. 2012 Feb;12(1):69-80. doi: 10.1037/a0024755. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

Feeling bad about being sad: the role of social expectancies in amplifying negative mood.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD4072, Australia. b.bastian@uq.edu.au

Abstract

Our perception of how others expect us to feel has significant implications for our emotional functioning. Across 4 studies the authors demonstrate that when people think others expect them not to feel negative emotions (i.e., sadness) they experience more negative emotion and reduced well-being. The authors show that perceived social expectancies predict these differences in emotion and well-being both more consistently than-and independently of-personal expectancies and that they do so by promoting negative self-evaluation when experiencing negative emotion. We find evidence for these effects within Australia (Studies 1 and 2) as well as Japan (Study 2), although the effects of social expectancies are especially evident in the former (Studies 1 and 2). We also find experimental evidence for the causal role of social expectancies in negative emotional responses to negative emotional events (Studies 3 and 4). In short, when people perceive that others think they should feel happy, and not sad, this leads them to feel sad more frequently and intensely.

PMID:
21787076
DOI:
10.1037/a0024755
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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