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Psychooncology. 2012 Dec;21(12):1285-91. doi: 10.1002/pon.2017. Epub 2011 Jul 21.

Skin care behaviors among melanoma survivors.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. dbowen@bu.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Clinical recommendations for survivors of melanoma generally include skin care behaviors, including regular physician and skin self-examination to identify any recurrences or second primary disease early, as well as sun protection. We measured skin care behaviors in a population-based sample of melanoma survivors.

METHODS:

Melanoma survivors were approached through the regional National Cancer Institute-funded cancer registry (Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results) and recruited to this study with a response rate of approximately 75%, for a total sample of n = 313.

RESULTS:

The sample was 99% Caucasian, 56% female, 44% male, 81% married, 62% college educated, and 48% with an income over 70 K annually, with an average age of 56 years. Over the last 7 days, a total of 45% reported wearing sunscreen, 59% reported wearing long sleeves, 80% reported wearing pants, 35% reported wearing something on the head, and 36% stayed in available shade. Skin self-examination behaviors were reported at relatively low frequencies, with only 22% performing a thorough check on skin. A total of 88% of survivors reported that their physician checked their skin in the past few years by having all clothes removed. A multivariate analysis using logistic regression indicated that perceived risk was positively related to having the skin checked by a medical provider but no other skin protection behaviors. Gender effects were also detected for wearing sunscreen and wearing a hat or scarf.

DISCUSSION:

Data indicate that melanoma survivors are performing sun protection behaviors to a moderate extent. Future studies can address barriers to consistent use of these behaviors in melanoma survivors.

PMID:
21780240
DOI:
10.1002/pon.2017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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