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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2011 Aug;93(2):268-75. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2011.05.035. Epub 2011 Jul 19.

Relative utility of 1-h Oral Glucose Tolerance Test as a measure of abnormal glucose homeostasis.

Author information

1
University of Puerto Rico, Center for Clinical Research and Health Promotion, School of Dental Medicine, Medical Sciences Campus, San Juan PR 00936, Puerto Rico. kaumudi.joshipura@upr.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Impaired glucose tolerance based on 2-h glucose levels is more predictive of future cardiovascular disease and more sensitive in detecting earlier diabetes compared to impaired fasting glucose. However, the 1-h OGTT may be even more sensitive than the 2-h. We assessed the relative value of 1-h OGTT by exploring its relationship with adiposity and other measures of glucose homeostasis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Ninety four overweight/obese individuals free of diabetes and major cardiovascular conditions were included in the analyses. We adjusted for age, gender, smoking status and physical activity. One-h OGTT showed similar partial correlations with fasting glucose and 2-h OGTT (r=0.60 and 0.64 respectively). Fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA correlated better with 1-h OGTT (r=0.60, 0.47 and 0.52) than with 2-h OGTT (r=0.50, 0.41, and 0.45). BMI and waist circumference also showed stronger correlation with 1-h (r=0.31, 0.29), compared to 2-h OGTT (r=0.16, 0.16) or fasting glucose (r=0.23, 0.22). Metabolic syndrome was associated similarly with 1-h and 2-h OGTT.

CONCLUSIONS:

The 1-h OGTT correlates well with both fasting glucose and 2-h OGTT and shows similar or higher associations with obesity measures. The 1-h OGTT has potential utility in epidemiologic studies.

PMID:
21775009
PMCID:
PMC3156353
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2011.05.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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