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Arch Dis Child. 2011 Nov;96(11):1033-7. doi: 10.1136/adc.2010.207969. Epub 2011 Jul 18.

Antibiotic prescriptions in French day-care centres: 1999-2008.

Author information

1
Public Health Department, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Nice, Nice, France. dunais.b@chu-nice.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Trends in antibiotic prescriptions among children attending day-care centres (DCCs) were studied before and after campaigns promoting prudent antibiotic use and the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Cross-sectional studies were conducted on a two-stage cluster sample of children aged 3 months to 4 years attending DCCs the Alpes Maritimes in France between January and March in 1999, 2004 and 2008. Antibiotic treatments given in the previous 3 months and their indications were studied.

INTERVENTIONS:

A local public health intervention promoting prudent paediatric antibiotic prescriptions was implemented in 2000 and followed by a nationwide campaign in 2002.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Trends in the number and type of antibiotic prescriptions, and indications for antibiotic use, over the study period.

RESULTS:

217, 254 and 279 children provided information in 1999, 2004 and 2008, respectively. The proportion of children who had received antibiotics within the previous 3 months fell from 58.5% (95% CI 51.7% to 65.2%) in 1999 to 29.7% (95% CI 24.4 to 35.5) in 2008. The number of treated episodes/child dropped from 0.99±1.14 to 0.35±1.16 (p<0.00001). Otitis media accounted for an increasing percentage of antibiotic use, rising from 35.3% (95% CI 29.0% to 42.2%) to 56.0% (95% CI 46.3% to 66.6%). Prescriptions for third-generation cephalosporins increased from 26.0% (95% CI 20.4% to 32.5%) to 49.5% (95% CI 39.2% to 59.7%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Paediatric antibiotic prescriptions dropped significantly following campaigns and the introduction of pneumococcal immunisation in France. Improvements are still needed regarding indications and choice of compounds.

PMID:
21771764
DOI:
10.1136/adc.2010.207969
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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