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Pediatrics. 2011 Aug;128(2):e317-23. doi: 10.1542/peds.2010-2559. Epub 2011 Jul 18.

The association of BMI status with adolescent preventive screening.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA. jasikc@peds.ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the relationship between BMI status (normal, overweight, and obese) and preventive screening among adolescents at their last checkup.

METHODS:

We used population-based data from the 2003-2007 California Health Interview Surveys, telephone interviews of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years with a checkup in the past 12 months (n = 9220). Respondents were asked whether they received screening for nutrition, physical activity, and emotional distress. BMI was calculated from self-reported height and weight: (1) normal weight or underweight (<85th percentile); (2) overweight (85th-94th percentile); and (3) obese (>95th percentile). Multivariate logistic regression models tested how screening by topic differed according to BMI status, adjusting for age, gender, income, race/ethnicity, and survey year.

RESULTS:

Screening percentages in the pooled sample (all 3 years) were higher for obese, but not overweight, adolescents for physical activity (odds ratio: 1.4; P < .01) and nutrition (odds ratio: 1.6; screening did not differ P < .01). Stratified analysis by year revealed higher screening for obese (versus normal-weight) adolescents for nutrition and physical activity in 2003 and for all 3 topics in 2005. However, by 2007, screening did not differ according to BMI status. Overall screening between 2003 and 2007 declined for nutrition (75%-59%; P < .01), physical activity (74%-60%; P < .01), and emotional distress (31%-24%; P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Obese adolescents receive more preventive screening versus their normal-weight peers. Overweight adolescents do not report more screening, but standards of care dictate increased attention for this group. These results are discouraging amid a rise in pediatric obesity and new guidelines that recommend screening by BMI status.

PMID:
21768313
PMCID:
PMC3146353
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2010-2559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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