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Rehabil Psychol. 2011 Aug;56(3):212-8. doi: 10.1037/a0024118.

The effect of homework compliance on treatment outcomes for participants with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

Author information

  • 1Center for Community Research, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614, USA. leahlavaty@gmail.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined the relationship between level of treatment engagement through completion of homework on treatment outcomes within nonpharmacological interventions for participants with ME/CFS.

METHOD:

A sample of 82 participants with ME/CFS was randomly assigned to one of four nonpharmacological interventions. Each intervention involved 13 sessions over the course of 6 months. Change scores were computed for self-report measures taken at baseline and 12-month follow-up. Homework compliance was calculated as the percentage of completed assignments across the total number of sessions and grouped into three categories: minimum (0-25%), moderate (25.1-75%), or maximum (75.1-100%).

RESULTS:

Findings revealed that after controlling for treatment condition, those who completed a maximum amount of homework had greater improvement on a number of self-report outcome measures involving role, social, and mental health functioning. There were no differential improvements in physical and fatigue functioning based on level of homework compliance.

IMPLICATIONS:

Findings from this study suggest homework compliance can have a positive influence on some aspects of physical, social, and mental health functioning in participants with ME/CFS. It should be emphasized that these interventions do not cure this illness. The lack of significant changes in physical functioning and fatigue levels suggests a need for more multidisciplinary treatment approaches that can elicit improvement in these areas.

PMID:
21767035
PMCID:
PMC3166212
DOI:
10.1037/a0024118
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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