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Pharm Biol. 2011 Nov;49(11):1128-36. doi: 10.3109/13880209.2011.571264. Epub 2011 Jul 12.

Hydroalcoholic extract of Emblica officinalis protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus in rats: evidence for an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Emblica officinalis (Euphorbiaceae), commonly known as amla, is traditionally used for central nervous system (CNS) disorders.

OBJECTIVE:

In the present study, the effect of standardized hydroalcoholic extract of E. officinalis fruit (HAEEO), an Indian medicinal plant with potent antioxidant activity, was studied against kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures, cognitive deficits and on markers of oxidative stress.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Rats were administered KA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and observed for behavioral changes, incidence, and latency of convulsions over 4 h. The rats were thereafter sacrificed for estimation of oxidative stress parameters: thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and glutathione (GSH). The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was also determined in the rat brain.

RESULTS:

Pretreatment with HAEEO (500 and 700 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P < 0.001) increased the latency of seizures as compared with the vehicle-treated KA group. HAEEO significantly prevented the increase in TBARS levels and ameliorated the fall in GSH. Furthermore, HAEEO dose-dependently attenuated the KA-induced increase in the TNF-α level in the brain. HAEEO also significantly improved the cognitive deficit induced by KA, as evidenced by increased latency in passive avoidance task.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

HAEEO at the dose of 700 mg/kg, i.p., was most effective in suppressing KA-induced seizures, cognitive decline, and oxidative stress in the brain. These neuroprotective effects may be due to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of HAEEO.

PMID:
21749189
DOI:
10.3109/13880209.2011.571264
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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