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J Epidemiol. 2011;21(5):376-84. doi: 10.2188/jea.JE20110001. Epub 2011 Jul 9.

Effects of smoking and smoking cessation on life expectancy in an elderly population in Beijing, China, 1992-2000: an 8-year follow-up study.

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1
Department of Epidemiology & Social Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We assessed the effects of smoking and smoking cessation on life expectancy and active life expectancy among persons aged 55 years or older in Beijing.

METHODS:

This study included 1593 men and 1664 women who participated in the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging, which commenced in 1992 and had 4 survey waves up to year 2000. An abridged life table was used to estimate life expectancy, in which age-specific mortality and age-specific disability rates were adjusted by using a discrete-time hazard model to control confounders.

RESULTS:

The mean ages (SD) for men and women were 70.1 (9.25) and 70.2 (8.72) years, respectively; mortality and disability rates during follow-up were 34.7% and 8.0%, respectively. In both sexes, never smokers had the highest life expectancy and active life expectancy across ages, as compared with current and former smokers. Current heavy smokers had a shorter life expectancy and a shorter active life expectancy than light smokers. Among former smokers, male long-term quitters had a longer life expectancy and longer active life expectancy than short-term quitters, but this was not the case in women.

CONCLUSIONS:

Older adults remain at higher risk of mortality and morbidity from smoking and can expect to live a longer and healthier life after smoking cessation.

PMID:
21747208
PMCID:
PMC3899437
DOI:
10.2188/jea.JE20110001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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