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Ann Oncol. 2012 Feb;23(2):311-8. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdr331. Epub 2011 Jul 11.

A meta-analysis of coffee consumption and pancreatic cancer.

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1
Department of Epidermiology, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Since when in 1981 a case-control study showed a positive association between coffee and pancreatic cancer, several studies reported inconsistent results on this issue.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We conducted a systematic bibliography search updated March 2011 to identify observational studies providing quantitative estimates for pancreatic cancer risk in relation to coffee consumption. We used a meta-analytic approach to estimate overall relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the highest versus the lowest coffee consumption categories, using random-effects models.

RESULTS:

Based on 37 case-control and 17 cohort studies (10,594 cases), the pooled RR for the highest versus lowest intake was 1.13 (95% CI 0.99-1.29). Considering only the smoking-adjusting studies, the pooled RRs were 1.10 (95% CI 0.92-1.31) for the 22 case-control, 1.04 (95% CI 0.80-1.36) for the 15 cohort, and 1.08 (95% CI 0.94-1.25) for all studies. The pooled RR for the increment of one cup of coffee per day was 1.03 (95% CI 0.99-1.06) for the 28 smoking-adjusting studies reporting three or more coffee consumption categories. No significant heterogeneity was observed across strata of study design, sex, geographic region, and other selected characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS:

This meta-analysis provides quantitative evidence that coffee consumption is not appreciably related to pancreatic cancer risk, even at high intakes.

PMID:
21746805
DOI:
10.1093/annonc/mdr331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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