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Liver Int. 2011 Sep;31(8):1163-70. doi: 10.1111/j.1478-3231.2011.02556.x. Epub 2011 Jun 7.

Maternal hepatitis B and hepatitis C carrier status and perinatal outcomes.

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1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

To examine the association between maternal hepatitis B and C mono- and co-infections with singleton pregnancy outcomes in the state of Florida.

METHODS:

We analysed all Florida births from 1998 to 2007 using birth certificate records linked to hospital discharge data. The main outcomes of interest were selected pregnancy outcomes including preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA), fetal distress, neonatal jaundice and congenital anomaly.

RESULTS:

The study sample consisted of 1,670,369 records. Human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and all forms of substance abuse were more frequent in mothers with hepatitis B and C infection. After using multivariable modelling to adjust for important socio-demographical variables and obstetric complications, women with hepatitis C infection were more likely to have infants born preterm [odds ratio (OR), 1.40; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.15-1.72], with LBW (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.11-1.74) and congenital anomaly (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.14-2.11). In addition, women with hepatitis B infection were less likely to have infants born SGA (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.66-0.95).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings provide further understanding of the association between maternal hepatitis B or C carrier status and perinatal outcomes. Infants born to women with hepatitis C infection appear to be at risk for poor birth outcomes, including preterm birth, LBW and congenital anomaly.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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