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Neurosci Lett. 2011 Aug 21;501(1):31-4. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2011.06.033. Epub 2011 Jun 29.

RGS9-2 modulates nociceptive behaviour and opioid-mediated synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn.

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1
Department of Basic Science, University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete 71003, Greece.

Abstract

The regulator of G protein signaling 9-2 (RGS9-2) is a constituent of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) macromolecular complexes with a major role in regulation of GPCR activity in the central nervous system. Previous in situ hybridization and Western blot studies revealed that RGS9-2 is expressed in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. In the present study, we monitored tail withdrawal latencies to noxious thermal stimuli and performed in vitro whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiological recordings from neurons in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn to examine the role of RGS9-2 in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in nociceptive behaviours and opiate mediated modulation of synaptic transmission. Our findings obtained from RGS9 knockout mice indicate that the lack of RGS9-2 protein decreases sensitivity to thermal stimuli and to the analgesic actions of morphine in the tail immersion paradigm. This modulatory role of RGS9-2 on opiate-mediated responses was further supported by electrophysiological studies showing that hyperpolarization of neurons in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn evoked by application of DAMGO ([d-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin, a mu opioid receptor agonist) was diminished in RGS9 knockout mice. The results indicate that RGS9-2 enhances the effect of morphine and may play a crucial role in opiate-mediated analgesic mechanisms at the level of the spinal cord.

PMID:
21741448
PMCID:
PMC3394093
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2011.06.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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