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Cleft Palate Craniofac J. 2012 Nov;49(6):718-29. doi: 10.1597/10-018. Epub 2011 Jul 8.

Factors associated with parental adaptation to having a child with a cleft lip and/or palate: the impact of parental diagnosis.

Author information

1
First Steps Early Intervention and Community Psychology Service, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.katherine.o’hanlon@nhs.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the impact of parental diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate on factors associated with parental adaptation to having a child with a cleft.

DESIGN:

A mixed-methodological, quasi-experimental, causal-comparative research design.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 27 parents born with a cleft lip and/or palate and 27 parents born without a cleft lip and/or palate completed the study measures.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

The Ways of Coping Questionnaire, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory were included along with a researcher-designed, cleft-specific questionnaire.

RESULTS:

The cleft-specific questionnaire revealed that parents born with a cleft lip and/or palate reported feelings of guilt significantly more often than did parents without a cleft lip and/or palate. Parents without a cleft reported feeling anxious significantly more often than did parents born with a cleft lip and/or palate. The qualitative aspect of the study yielded further between-group differences. The feeling that their own cleft-related experiences influenced their adjustment to having a child with a cleft emerged as a dominant theme for parents born with a cleft; whereas, parents without a cleft lip and/or palate highlighted the importance of accurate information and positive interactions with clinicians in facilitating adjustment to their situation. No significant between-group differences were found on the standardized measures; however, the study's small sample size increases the risk of type II error and may account for the lack of significant findings.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings appear to provide support for the widely held clinical opinion that parental diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate impacts how parents cope with and adjust to their child's diagnosis.

PMID:
21740176
DOI:
10.1597/10-018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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