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J Crit Care. 2012 Feb;27(1):73-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.017. Epub 2011 Jul 6.

Short-term prognosis of critically ill surgical patients: the impact of duration of invasive organ support therapies.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Campus Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich, D-81377 Munich, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We wanted to identify the importance of the duration of invasive ventilation and of renal replacement therapy for short-term prognosis of surgical patients treated in an intensive care unit (ICU).

METHODS:

We analyzed adult patients (n = 1462) who had an ICU length of stay of more than 4 days and who were followed up until the end of the short-term phase after ICU admission. Duration of different invasive therapies was evaluated by constructing specific vectors that tested effects of time-dependent variables on outcome after a lag time of 7 days.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Eight hundred eight patients (56.6%) were still alive at the end of the short-term phase. During the short-term phase, 85.3% of the 1462 patients required invasive ventilation, and 16.1%, a continuous renal replacement therapy. Besides the underlying disease and disease severity at ICU admission, the need for invasive ventilation or renal replacement therapy was associated with poorer outcome. Duration of invasive ventilation shortened survival if treatment lasted for more than 11 days (nonlinear association). In contrast, duration of renal replacement therapy was unimportant for short-term prognosis.

CONCLUSION:

Prolonged duration of invasive ventilation but not of renal replacement therapy is inversely related to short-term survival.

PMID:
21737240
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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