Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Crit Care. 2011 Oct;26(5):441-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.008. Epub 2011 Jul 6.

Nonhematological organ dysfunction and positive fluid balance are important determinants of outcome in adults with severe dengue infection: a multicenter study from India.

Author information

1
Department of Intensive Care, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the study was to explore determinants of outcome in adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome.

METHODS:

We performed a multicenter, retrospective, observational study over a 2-year period in 3 intensive care units (ICUs) in Pune (India).

RESULTS:

One hundred eighty-four adult patients were admitted to the ICU with a positive dengue immunoglobulin M test result; 43 met the World Health Organization criteria for dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. One patient who was transferred to another hospital and whose outcome was unknown was not included in the analysis. Of the 42 patients, 20 (48%) had multiorgan failure on ICU admission. The ICU mortality was 19% (8/42). Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have cardiovascular (100% vs 12%), respiratory (88% vs 12%), or neurological (75% vs 12%) failure (all P < .01). Hematological failure was not associated with a higher risk of death. Cumulative fluid balance at 72 hours was more positive in nonsurvivors than in survivors (6.2 vs 3.5 L, P < .05). Serum albumin concentrations at ICU admission were lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors (2.9 ± 0.3 vs 3.4 ± 0.7 g/dL, P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

In our cohort, outcome from severe dengue was primarily related to nonhematological organ failure. Low serum albumin concentration on ICU admission and a more positive fluid balance at 72 hours were also associated with worse outcomes.

PMID:
21737234
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcrc.2011.05.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center