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Radiother Oncol. 2011 Dec;101(3):495-501. doi: 10.1016/j.radonc.2011.06.010. Epub 2011 Jul 5.

Tobacco smoking and long-lasting symptoms from the bowel and the anal-sphincter region after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

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  • 1Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden. david.alsadius@oncology.gu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Tobacco smoking can cause vascular injury, tissue hypoxia and fibrosis as can ionizing radiation. However, we do not know if tobacco smoking increases the risk of long-term side effects after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

METHODS:

We identified 985 men treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, long-lasting symptoms appearing after radiotherapy for prostate cancer were assessed through a study-specific questionnaire as were smoking habits and demographic factors of all these men. In the questionnaire the prostate-cancer survivors were asked to report symptom occurrence the previous six months.

RESULTS:

We obtained information on tobacco smoking from 836 of the 985 prostate-cancer survivors with a median time to follow-up of six years (range 2-14 years). The prevalence ratio of defecation urgency among current smokers compared to never smokers was 1.6 (95% CI 1.2-2.2). Corresponding prevalence ratio for diarrhea was 2.8 (95% CI 1.2-6.5), the sensation of bowel not completely emptied after defecation 2.1 (95% CI 1.3-3.3) and for sudden emptying of all stools into clothing without forewarning 4.7 (95% CI 2.3-9.7).

CONCLUSION:

Tobacco smoking among prostate-cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy increases the risk of certain long-lasting symptoms from the bowel and anal-sphincter region.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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