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J Anim Sci. 2011 Dec;89(12):3954-72. doi: 10.2527/jas.2010-3597. Epub 2011 Jul 1.

Circulating ghrelin and leptin concentrations and growth hormone secretagogue receptor abundance in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue of beef cattle exhibiting differences in composition of gain.

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1
Alltech Inc., Brookings, SD 57006, USA.

Abstract

Data from species other than cattle indicate that ghrelin and GH secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) could play a key role in fat deposition, energy homeostasis, or glucose metabolism by directly affecting liver and adipose tissue metabolism. Beef steers (n = 72) were used to test the hypothesis that plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and abundance of the GHS-R in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues differ in steers exhibiting differences in composition of gain. At trial initiation (d 0), 8 steers were slaughtered for initial carcass composition. The remaining 64 steers were stratified by BW, allotted to pen, and treatment was assigned randomly to pen. Steers were not implanted with anabolic steroids. Treatments were 1) a low-energy (LE) diet fed during the growing period (0 to 111 d) followed by a high-energy (HE) diet during the finishing period (112 to 209 d; LE-HE) or 2) the HE diet for the duration of the trial (1 to 209 d; HE-HE). Eight steers per treatment were slaughtered on d 88, 111, 160, and 209. Carcass ninth, tenth, and eleventh rib sections were dissected for chemical composition and regression equations were developed to predict compositional gain. Liver, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissues were frozen in liquid nitrogen for subsequent Western blotting for GHS-R. Replicate blood samples collected before each slaughter were assayed for ghrelin and leptin concentrations. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, the rate of carcass fat accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was greater (P < 0.001) in HE-HE steers whereas the rate of carcass protein accretion (g·kg of shrunk BW(-1)) was less (P < 0.001) compared with LE-HE steers. When compared at a common compositional fat end-point, plasma leptin, ghrelin, and insulin concentrations were greater (P < 0.05) for HE-HE compared with LE-HE steers. Abundance of the GHS-R, to which ghrelin binds, increased over time in liver and adipose tissue but did not differ as a result of treatment. Plasma ghrelin concentrations were increased for cattle continuously fed the HE diet as they became increasingly fatter; however, abundance of the GHS-R in liver, muscle, and subcutaneous adipose tissue was not different between treatment groups. The role of ghrelin in cattle metabolism warrants further investigation as it could have a significant effect on composition of BW gain, feed efficiency, and metabolic disorders such as ketosis and fatty liver.

PMID:
21724941
DOI:
10.2527/jas.2010-3597
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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