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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2012 Jan;36(1):271-84. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2011.06.007. Epub 2011 Jun 23.

Smoking, quitting, and psychiatric disease: a review.

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1
Hôpital Emile Roux, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Limeil-Brévannes, France. henri-jean.aubin@pbr.aphp.fr

Abstract

Tobacco smoking among patients with psychiatric disease is more common than in the general population, due to complex neurobiological, psychological, and pharmacotherapeutic mechanisms. Nicotine dependence exposes smokers with co-occurring mental illness to increased risks of smoking-related morbidity, mortality, and to detrimental impacts on their quality of life. The neurobiological and psychosocial links to smoking appear stronger in certain comorbidities, notably depression and schizophrenia. Through its action on the cholinergic system, nicotine may have certain beneficial effects across a range of mental health domains in these patients, including improved concentration and cognition, relief of stress and depressive affect, and feeling pleasurable sensations. Despite the availability of effective smoking cessation pharmacotherapies and psychosocial interventions, as well as increasing evidence that individuals with psychiatric disorders are motivated to quit, nicotine dependence remains an undertreated and under-recognized problem within this patient population. Evidence suggests that provision of flexible and individualized treatment programs may be successful. Furthermore, the complicated relationship observed between nicotine dependence, nicotine withdrawal symptoms, and mental illness necessitates integration of close monitoring in any successful smoking cessation program.

PMID:
21723317
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2011.06.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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