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Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jan;10(1):30-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2011.06.029. Epub 2011 Jun 30.

Low risk of gastrointestinal cancer among patients with celiac disease, inflammation, or latent celiac disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neonatology, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital-Danderyd, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Celiac disease has been associated with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers in small studies; risks have not been estimated from large populations or based on histopathology analyses.

METHODS:

We examined the risk of GI cancers by using data from cohorts of patients with celiac disease (villous atrophy, Marsh score of 3; n = 28,882) or inflammation (Marsh score of 1-2; n = 12,860); biopsy samples were evaluated at 28 pathology centers. A third cohort included 3705 individuals with latent celiac disease (normal mucosa, but positive serology results). Data were compared with those from an age- and sex-matched population.

RESULTS:

Of patients with celiac disease, 372 developed incident GI cancers; 347 patients with inflammation and 38 with latent celiac disease developed GI cancers. In the first year after diagnosis and initial biopsy, celiac disease was associated with 5.95-fold increase in risk of incident GI cancer (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.64-7.64); the hazard ratio [HR] for inflammation was 9.13 (95% CI, 7.19-11.6) and for latent celiac disease was 8.10 (95% CI, 4.69-14.0). After the first year, patients were at no significant increase in risk for GI cancers; the HR for celiac disease was 1.07 (95% CI, 0.93-1.23), for inflammation it was 1.16 (95% CI, 0.98-1.37), and for latent celiac disease it was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.56-1.66). The absolute risk for any GI cancer in patients with celiac disease was 101/100,000 person-years, with an excess risk of 2/100,000 person-years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although celiac disease, inflammation, and latent disease all increase risk for GI cancers in the first year after diagnosis, there is no increase in risk thereafter.

PMID:
21723236
DOI:
10.1016/j.cgh.2011.06.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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