Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2011 Aug;59(8):1490-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2011.03494.x. Epub 2011 Jun 30.

Cognitive impairment predicts fatal incident stroke: findings from a national sample of older adults.

Author information

1
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. pjclarke@umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the effect of cognitive impairment on fatal and nonfatal incident stroke in older adults.

DESIGN:

A large, national, prospective, population-based study of a representative cohort of older Canadians followed over a 10-year period.

SETTING:

Secondary analyses were conducted using data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, a population-based study of older adults followed prospectively from 1991 to 2001.

PARTICIPANTS:

Nine thousand four hundred fifty-one adults aged 65 and older who had not previously been diagnosed with stroke at baseline (in 1991).

MEASUREMENTS:

In addition to known risk factors, the independent contribution of cognitive function (diagnosed in a clinical examination) was examined as a risk for stroke in older adults.

RESULTS:

Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that cognitive impairment was associated with twice the odds of fatal incident stroke, controlling for well-established risk factors.

CONCLUSION:

This study provides further evidence for the need to consider cognitive function in relation to stroke risk in older populations.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for MLibrary (Deep Blue)
Loading ...
Support Center