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Transl Res. 2011 Jul;158(1):38-53. doi: 10.1016/j.trsl.2011.02.006. Epub 2011 Mar 21.

Nutrient-enhanced diet reduces noise-induced damage to the inner ear and hearing loss.

Author information

1
Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Box 100174, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA. colleeng@phhp.ufl.edu

Abstract

Oxidative stress has been implicated broadly as a cause of cell death and neural degeneration in multiple disease conditions; however, the evidence for successful intervention with dietary antioxidant manipulations has been mixed. In this study, we investigated the potential for protection of cells in the inner ear using a dietary supplement with multiple antioxidant components, which were selected for their potential interactive effectiveness. Protection against permanent threshold shift (PTS) was observed in CBA/J mice maintained on a diet supplemented with a combination of β-carotene, vitamins C and E, and magnesium when compared with PTS in control mice maintained on a nutritionally complete control diet. Although hair cell survival was not enhanced, noise-induced loss of type II fibrocytes in the lateral wall was significantly reduced (P < 0.05), and there was a trend toward less noise-induced loss in strial cell density in animals maintained on the supplemented diet. Taken together, our data suggest that prenoise oral treatment with the high-nutrient diet can protect cells in the inner ear and reduce PTS in mice. The demonstration of functional and morphologic preservation of cells in the inner ear with oral administration of this antioxidant supplemented diet supports the possibility of translation to human patients and suggests an opportunity to evaluate antioxidant protection in mouse models of oxidative stress-related disease and pathology.

PMID:
21708355
PMCID:
PMC3132794
DOI:
10.1016/j.trsl.2011.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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