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J Affect Disord. 2011 Nov;134(1-3):126-32. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2011.06.004. Epub 2011 Jun 25.

Mindfulness, response styles and dysfunctional attitudes in bipolar disorder.

Author information

1
Black Dog Institute, Hospital Rd, Randwick, NSW, Australia. t.perich@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study aimed to examine differences between mindfulness, dysfunctional attitudes and response styles in subjects with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and controls.

METHOD:

A total of 192 participants were included in this study: 90 with bipolar disorder, 36 with remitted major depressive disorder and 66 subjects without a current or past history of a mood disorder.

RESULTS:

After controlling for current mood state and co-morbid anxiety disorders, the groups did not differ on mindfulness or response styles scores, however, those with bipolar disorder scored significantly higher on the Dependency and Achievement subscales of the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale than the other two groups.

LIMITATIONS:

Sample sizes were relatively small for the control and remitted major depressive disorder groups making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants with bipolar disorder appear to significantly differ from remitted depressives and controls on certain cognitive styles such as Dependency and Achievement on the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale. Further research may help to understand how these cognitive domains impact on the course and outcome of bipolar disorder.

PMID:
21705092
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2011.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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