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Am J Infect Control. 2011 Nov;39(9):732-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2010.12.020. Epub 2011 Jun 25.

Hand hygiene in pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit patients: daily opportunities and indication- and profession-specific analyses of compliance.

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1
Department of Infection Control and Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Germany. sscheithauer@ukaachen.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hand hygiene is considered to be the single most effective tool to prevent health care-associated infections. Daily hand hygiene opportunities and compliance for pediatric/neonatal intensive care units (ICU) are currently unknown.

METHODS:

This was a prospective observational study in pediatric and neonatal ICU patients with analyses of hand hygiene behavior in relation to profession, indication, and shift and correlation with disinfectant usage.

RESULTS:

Hand hygiene opportunities were significantly higher for pediatric (321/24 hours) than neonatal (194/24 hours; P = .024) patients. Observed compliance rates were 53% (pediatric) and 61% (neonatal) and found to be significantly higher in nurses (57%; 66%) than in physicians (29%, 52%, respectively; P < .001; P = .017, respectively). For neonates, compliance rates were significantly higher before patient contact and aseptic tasks (78%) than after patient, patient body fluid, or patients' surrounding contact (57%; P < .001). Calculating disinfectant usage revealed a 3-fold lower compliance rate of 17%.

CONCLUSION:

This study provides the first data on opportunities for and compliance with hand hygiene in pediatric/neonatal patients encompassing the whole day and night activities and including a comparison of observed and calculated compliance rates. Observation revealed high compliance especially in nurses and in situations of greatest impact. The data provide a detailed characterization of hand hygiene performance in the neonatal/pediatric ICU setting.

PMID:
21704425
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2010.12.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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