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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2011 Nov;96(4):553-63. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2011.06.006. Epub 2011 Jun 16.

Cognitive dysfunction in depression: neurocircuitry and new therapeutic strategies.

Author information

1
Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. james.murrough@mssm.edu

Abstract

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a disabling medical condition associated with significant morbidity, mortality and public health costs. However, neurocircuitry abnormalities underlying depression remain incompletely understood and consequently current treatment options are unfortunately limited in efficacy. Recent research has begun to focus specifically on cognitive aspects of depression and potential neurobiological correlates. Two fundamental types of cognitive dysfunction observed in MDD are cognitive biases, which include distorted information processing or attentional allocation toward negative stimuli, and cognitive deficits, which include impairments in attention, short-term memory and executive functioning. In this article, we present a selective review of current research findings in these domains and examine neuroimaging research that is beginning to characterize the neurocircuitry underlying these biases and deficits. We propose that deficient cognitive functioning, attention biases and the sustained negative affect characteristic of MDD can be understood as arising in part from dysfunctional prefrontal-subcortical circuitry and related disturbances in the cognitive control of emotion. Finally, we highlight potential new pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic strategies for MDD based on an evolving mechanistic understanding of the disorder.

PMID:
21704176
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2011.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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