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Int J Nurs Stud. 2011 Dec;48(12):1551-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2011.05.015. Epub 2011 Jun 24.

The effects of ownership, staffing level and organisational justice on nurse commitment, involvement, and satisfaction: a questionnaire study.

Author information

1
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Elderly care systems have undergone a lot of changes in many European countries, including Finland. Most notably, the number of private for-profit firms has increased. Previous studies suggest that employee well-being and the quality of care might differ according to the ownership type.

OBJECTIVE:

The present study examined whether the ownership type and the staffing level were associated with organisational commitment, job involvement, and job satisfaction. In addition, we examined the potential moderating effect of organisational justice on these associations.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional questionnaire study.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING:

1047 Finnish female staff members aged 18-69 years working in sheltered housing or nursing homes (units n=179).

METHODS:

The relationships were studied with analyses of covariance (ANCOVA), adjusting for the effects of age and case-mix.

RESULTS:

Organisational commitment and job satisfaction levels were low in for-profit sheltered homes when justice levels were low, but when justice levels were high, for-profit sheltered homes did not differ from other ownership types. Similarly, organisational justice acted as a buffer against low commitment resulting from low staffing levels. Staffing levels were lowest in public sheltered homes and highest in not-for-profit sheltered homes.

CONCLUSION:

The results show that organisational justice can act as a buffer against low organisational commitment that results from low staffing levels and working in for-profit sheltered homes. Increasing justice in regard to the management, outcomes, and procedures in the organisation would thus be important.

PMID:
21703619
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2011.05.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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