Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Expert Rev Respir Med. 2011 Jun;5(3):425-40. doi: 10.1586/ers.11.7.

Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children.

Author information

1
Sleep Disorders Center, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 64239, Israel. tauman@tasmc.health.gov.il

Abstract

The clinical syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) in children is a distinct, yet somewhat overlapping disorder with the condition that occurs in adults, such that the clinical manifestations, polysomnographic findings, diagnostic criteria and treatment approaches need to be considered in an age-specific manner. Childhood OSAS has now become widely recognized as a frequent disorder and as a major public health problem. Pediatric OSAS, particularly when obesity is concurrently present, is associated with substantial end-organ morbidities and increased healthcare utilization. Although adenotonsillectomy (T&A) remains the first line of treatment, evidence in recent years suggests that the outcomes of this surgical procedure may not be as favorable as expected, such that post-T&A polysomnographic evaluation may be needed, especially in high-risk patient groups. In addition, incorporation of nonsurgical approaches for milder forms of the disorder and for residual OSAS after T&A is now being investigated.

PMID:
21702663
DOI:
10.1586/ers.11.7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center