Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Angle Orthod. 2011 Nov;81(6):1036-44. doi: 10.2319/122810-751.1. Epub 2011 Jun 23.

Archwire depth is a significant parameter in the frictional resistance of active and interactive, but not passive, self-ligating brackets.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics, University of Toronto, Canada. christa.oliver@utoronto.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To elucidate some of the parameters determining the frictional behavior of passive, active, and interactive self-ligating brackets during sliding mechanics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A custom jig mimicking the three-dimensional tooth movements that occur during sliding mechanics and an Instron testing machine were used to determine the resistance to sliding of six different self-ligating brackets (SPEED, In-Ovation C, CarrièreSLB, ClaritySL, SmartClip, VisionLP). Each bracket was tested on three rectangular stainless steel wires: 0.017 × 0.022 inch, 0.017 × 0.025 inch, and 0.019 × 0.025 inch. A two-way balanced analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

The four passive self-ligating brackets (CarrièreSLB, ClaritySL, SmartClip, VisionLP) displayed significantly lower frictional resistance (P < .001) than the remaining brackets, which featured an active (SPEED) or interactive (In-Ovation C) clip. The SPEED bracket consistently demonstrated the highest resistance to sliding.

CONCLUSIONS:

The mode of self-ligation appears to be the primary variable in determining the frictional behavior of orthodontic brackets undergoing sliding mechanics. Passive self-ligating brackets demonstrated significantly lower frictional resistance to sliding. With regard to the resistance of active self-ligating brackets, the depth (buccolingual thickness) of the wire had a more significant influence than its height.

PMID:
21699367
DOI:
10.2319/122810-751.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Allen Press, Inc.
Loading ...
Support Center