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Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2011 Jun;26(4):334-9. doi: 10.1177/1533317511412047. Epub 2011 Jun 21.

Explanations of AD in ethnic minority participants undergoing cognitive screening.

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  • 1Florida Atlantic University, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Boca Raton, FL, USA. rtappen@fau.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe and compare explanations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) of African American, Afro-Caribbean, and European American older adults undergoing cognitive screening. Participants were asked a series of open-ended questions regarding what they knew about AD and if they were experiencing memory problems. Responses were coded and quantized for analysis. Forty percent reported experiencing memory problems. Afro-Caribbeans made significantly more incorrect statements about AD and were less likely to identify memory loss as a symptom. Half the participants said they would seek their physician's advice if the screening was positive; none mentioned a memory disorder center. Misconceptions about AD included the effect of aluminum, brain collapse, relaxed brain, shaking, tremors, and physical illness. More Afro-Caribbeans, all of whom were first generation, had misconceptions about AD. Campaigns to educate the public about AD need to provide culturally sensitive and appropriate information to ethnic minority populations.

PMID:
21697141
DOI:
10.1177/1533317511412047
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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