Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Acad Med. 2011 Aug;86(8):953-61. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e31822225c5.

A national cohort study of MD-PhD graduates of medical schools with and without funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program.

Author information

1
Division of Health Behavior Research, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. djeffe@dom.wustl.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine whether prematriculation characteristics and career-setting preferences of MD-PhD graduates differ according to their schools' funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences' Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP).

METHOD:

The Association of American Medical Colleges provided deidentified records for the national cohort of all 1993-2000 U.S. medical school matriculants, 3,180 of whom graduated with dual MD-PhD degrees by March 2, 2009. The authors examined prematriculation characteristics, educational outcomes, and career-setting preferences at graduation in association with MD-PhD program graduation from schools with long-standing MSTP-funded, recent MSTP-funded, and non-MSTP-funded programs.

RESULTS:

Of 3,142 MD-PhD graduates with prematriculation data, 30% were women and 36% were nonwhite. Graduates from long-standing MSTP-funded schools (63% of 3,142 graduates) composed a more highly selective group academically (based on Medical College Admission Test scores) than did graduates from recent MSTP-funded (6%) and non-MSTP-funded schools (31%). Women and nonwhite graduates were more likely to have graduated from long-standing MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for MSTP funding and other variables, graduates with total debt of $100,000 or more were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences (nonuniversity clinical practice: odds ratio [OR] 3.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.86-6.87; undecided/other: OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.29-3.60). Neither gender nor race/ethnicity was independently associated with graduates' career-setting preferences.

CONCLUSIONS:

Women and nonwhite MD-PhD graduates more likely graduated from long-standing MSTP than non-MSTP-funded schools. Controlling for institutional MSTP funding, MD-PhD graduates with high debt were more likely to indicate non-research-related career-setting preferences.

PMID:
21694566
PMCID:
PMC3145809
DOI:
10.1097/ACM.0b013e31822225c5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center