Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Jul;53(7):794-8. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318221c64c.

The effects of age and shiftwork on perceived sleep problems: results from the VISAT combined longitudinal and cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. p.t.tucker@swan.ac.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

With workforces in industrialized countries getting older, the study examined how shiftworking affects sleep in later life.

METHOD:

Longitudinal data were collected in 1996, 2001, and 2006 from a large sample of employees who were 32, 42, 52, and 62 years old in 1996.

RESULTS:

Effects of shiftwork were most apparent in middle-aged participants, becoming less apparent in later years when people tended to leave shiftwork. Nevertheless, a group of younger former shiftworkers reported more sleep problems than those who had never worked shifts. Giving up shiftwork offset a trend for sleep problems to accumulate over time, with the net result of no change in sleep problems after cessation of shiftwork.

CONCLUSIONS:

Poor sleep quality is a temporary consequence of shiftwork for some, whereas for others it is a cause of shiftwork intolerance.

PMID:
21685800
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e318221c64c
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Support Center