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Haematologica. 2011 Oct;96(10):1504-11. doi: 10.3324/haematol.2011.042713. Epub 2011 Jun 17.

Impact of genetic abnormalities after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma: a report of the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

Author information

1
Hematology Department, University Hospital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. damien.roosweil@psl.aphp.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The impact of cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma after allogeneic stem cell transplantation has not been clearly defined. This study examines whether allogeneic stem cell transplantation could be of benefit for myeloma patients with high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

This is a retrospective multicenter analysis of the registry of the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire, including 143 myeloma patients transplanted between 1999 and 2008.

RESULTS:

The incidences of cytogenetic abnormalities were 59% for del(13q), 25% for t(4;14), 25% for del(17p) and 4% for t(14;16). When comparing the population carrying an abnormality to that without the same abnormality, no significant difference was found in progression-free survival, overall survival or progression rate. Patients were grouped according to the presence of any of the poor prognosis cytogenetic abnormalities t(4;14), del(17p) or t(14;16) (n=53) or their absence (n=32). No difference in outcomes was observed between these two groups: the 3-year progression-free survival, overall survival and progression rates were 30% versus 17% (P=0.9), 45% versus 39% (P=0.8) and 53% versus 75% (P=0.9), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that allogeneic stem cell transplantation could potentially be of benefit to high-risk myeloma patients.

PMID:
21685472
PMCID:
PMC3186312
DOI:
10.3324/haematol.2011.042713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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