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Front Med. 2011 Mar;5(1):94-100. doi: 10.1007/s11684-011-0116-z. Epub 2011 Mar 17.

Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

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1
Liaoyang Diabetic Hospital, Liaoyang, 111000, China.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used in clinical trials for severe diabetes, a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality. Bone marrow is the traditional source of human MSC, but human term placenta appears to be an alternative and more readily available source. Here, the therapeutic effect of human placenta-derived MSC (PD-MSC) was studied in type 2 diabetes patients with longer duration, islet cell dysfunction, high insulin doses as well as poor glycemic control in order to evaluate the safety, efficacy and feasibility of PDMSC treatment in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ten patients with T2D received three intravenous infusions of PDSC, with one month interval of infusion. The total number of PDSC for each patient was (1.22-1.51) × 10(6)/kg, with an average of 1.35 × 10(6)/kg. All of the patients were followed up after therapy for at least 3 months. A daily mean dose of insulin used in 10 patients was decreased from 63.7±18.7 to 34.7±13.4 IU (P<0.01), and the C-peptide level was increased from 4.1 ±3.7 ng/mL to 5.6 ±3.8 ng/mL (P<0.05) respectively after therapy. In 4 of 10 responders their insulin doses reduced more than 50% after infusion. The mean levels of insulin and C-peptide at each time point in a total of 10 patients was higher after treatment (P<0.05). No fever, chills, liver damage and other side effects were reported. The renal function and cardiac function were improved after infusion. The results obtained from this pilot clinical trial indicate that transplantation of PD-MSC represents a simple, safe and effective therapeutic approach for T2D patients with islet cell dysfunction. Further large-scale, randomized and well-controlled clinical studies will be required to substantiate these observations.

PMID:
21681681
DOI:
10.1007/s11684-011-0116-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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