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Int J Psychiatry Med. 2011;41(2):187-201.

Association between psychopathological factors and joint hypermobility syndrome in a group of undergraduates from a French university.

Author information

1
University Autonomous of Barcelona. c.baezavelasco@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the frequency of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) among university students and assess whether a relationship exists between this collagen condition and certain psychological variables.

METHOD:

A cross-sectional sample of 365 undergraduates at a French university was assessed with the Brighton's criteria for JHS, Somatosensory Amplification Scale (SSAS), Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).

RESULTS:

39.5% of the participants met Brighton's criteria for JHS. Scores of somatosensory amplification were higher among participants with JHS (t = -2.98; p = 0.03) independent of gender. Female participants with JHS had higher scores in depression (t = -2.01; p = 0.04) and general anxiety (t = -2.35; p = 0.01) than women without JHS. The percentage of males with a medium/high level of social anxiety was greater among participants with JHS (78.6% vs. 41.7%; chi2 = 6.18;p = 0.01). Logistic regression demonstrated that male sex and low level of somatosensory amplification are variables contrary to the presence of JHS.

CONCLUSION:

JHS is a frequent condition among young people evaluated. JHS is associated with psychological distress and higher levels of somatosensory amplification.

PMID:
21675349
DOI:
10.2190/PM.41.2.g
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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